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6/18/2014 » 6/20/2014
2014 Catholic Media Conference

Remembering Cardinal Foley
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Remembering John Foley 0 J. Doyle Remembering John Foley Good John Foley was one of a few priests and a handful of lay people we’ve known over many years who had an obvious and infectious love of their fellow human beings. He seemed to like everyone he met, and in any conversation you had with him you would feel you were the center of his world that moment. He was concerned, sympathetic, loving, often joking, and very kind. At one CPA convention my wife Ethel was delegated to pick him up at the airport in a limousine we hired. She said when she got there he had scooped up a half dozen young CPA members to bring along. That is a God-given talent, not something you learn in school or the seminary. John was an only child, much devoted to his mother, Regina, who was of course immensely proud of him and what he had become. At the same time she was a no-nonsense person who helped keep him the regular guy he really was. She didn’t want to go to Rome when he was appointed there, but finally relented and moved. He said later she didn’t much care for Rome or the Vatican pomp and circumstance. Douglas Martin, in the New York Times story about him, wrote that she chided him about gaining weight from the Roman cuisine: "John, there are 20 pounds of you that have not been ordained.” He was a wise, well-read and well-educated man, honest, frank and clear in his opinions, yet generous and charitable in how he presented them. He had a unique philosophy about humor, insisting that self-deprecating humor and puns are the only proper and Christian forms of humor, and that humor that makes fun of others is unkind. And most everybody who ever met him knows how much he loved puns, which became known as Foleyisms, for his frequent, creative, daring use of them. One time, though, he let himself go a bit off the track: When Pope John Paul II visited Ireland and a crowd of American Catholic and general media people were there to greet him, John was the American press liaison officer on the Pope’s plane. When he arrived at the press room, he told the assembled journalists that he had asked the Vatican press officer, an Italian priest then, about setting up a press conference with the Pope for the American journalists, who would be eagerly looking forward to it. He said the Italian was horrified at the idea, and quoted him as saying, "No! No! No press conference! They’ll just ask questions!” Those who knew John Foley quickly came to love him. We in the Catholic press are privileged to have known him, worked with him and admired him. 12/15/11 Jim Doyle, CPA Executive Director 1958-1988
by J. Doyle
Monday, December 19, 2011
From Denny Finneran 0 L. McDougal Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} DEAR FRIENDS: FATHER JOHN FOLEY HAD MANY PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS HOWEVER IN MY MIND AND HEART HE WILL ALWAYS BE REMEMBERED FOR HIS PERSONAL KINDNESS TO MYSELF AND OTHERS. HE NEVER FAILED TO REMEMBER MY LATE WIFE MARTHA'S STRUGGLE WITH MS IN HIS ONE-ON-ONE INQUIRIES ALWAYS ADDING HIS REMEMBRANCES IN MASS AND OTHER PRAYERS. A GOOD MAN WHO WILL BE MISSED.--DENNY FINNERAN, EDITOR/ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER EMERITUS, THE CATHOLIC EXPONENT, YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO
by L. McDougal
Monday, December 19, 2011
From Fr. John Catoir 0 L. McDougal Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} "In 1985, I was the Director of The Christophers. That year we gave an award to Pope John Paul II to honor his best selling  book "Crossing the Threshold of Hope".I didn't know how a priest could give an award to a pope, so I called Archbishop John Foley at his Vatican office. For five years we had served together on the Board of Directors of the Catholic Press Association. I asked John  two question: Do you think he will accept an award from us, and if so, would he be willing to send you to pick it up?He was very gracious and said he'd  get back to me. Two days later, he called with the good news; "the Pope said YES to both questions." We were ecstatic.On the big night Archbishop Foley  told the audience that John Paul  wanted to know more about The Christophers. He explained that his mother always loved the Christophers, and that he grew up reading Christopher literature. The Holy Father then agreed to send him to New York.The rest is history. There are many reasons why I will miss Cardinal John Foley.  His humility and his sense of humor are just two of his gifts that I admire most."
by L. McDougal
Monday, December 19, 2011
Another Quote from the Cardinal 0 L. McDougal Preface from The Mission and Future of the Catholic Press: Catholic Journalists Look at the Present and Future"When Bishop John England of Charleston founded the United States Catholic Miscellany in 1822, the first Catholic publication in the United States, he said that American Catholics needed a publication to inform and unite them. That need still exists.The mission of the Catholic press would seem to to be the same as it was in 1822 - to inform, form, inspire, educate and strengthen the religious identity of Catholics.Naturally, as the catholic population grows larger and better educated and as "niche" publications take on an ever greater importance in the marketplace, Catholic publications need to fill not only the "religious niche" but specialized needs within the general religious area- publications for senior citizens, for youth, for women, for scholars, for members of various religious organizations and movements. The challenge for all publishers, religious and secular, is the decline in the number of people who read newspapers and magazines and the continuing and indeed increasing competition of radio and television in all its forms: terrestrial, cable, direct broadcast via satellite. There is also the new competitor for attention: Internet.Within the vast number of choices available to all Americans, including American Catholics, the publishers of Catholic publications must produce publications which are interesting, attractive, indeed compelling!But Catholics will always need publications. We are people of the book, redeemed by the Word in Jesus Christ. We will continue to need the written word to inform us, to help form  our attitudes in a Christian way, to help us to "put on" the Lord Jesus in the modern world, to provide us with ideas and models for putting into practice in our daily lives and in society the teaching of Christ and of his Church, to nourish us spiritually and to help reinforce that identity with Christ and his Church so essential for a fruitful and happy life on this earth and for eternal life in heaven.May the catholic press continue to flourish and to communicate the word of everlasting life!"
by L. McDougal
Friday, December 16, 2011
The Unforgettable Cardinal John Foley 0 R. Zyskowski Goodbye to a mentor and a friend Many will remember him as the voice doing the "play-by-play” during the Pope’s Christmas Midnight Mass from St. Peter’s Basilica, something he did for 25 years up until two years ago. Journalists around the world will remember him as the archbishop who got them a radio or television feed or a straight answer about what the church teaches and why. Those of us in Catholic media will remember the Philadelphian who became a Cardinal of the Church for his hilarious stories, his love of puns, and his commitment to his faith, to the church and to truthful Catholic journalism. I remember John Patrick Foley as a mentor who became a friend. Cardinal Foley, who died Dec. 11, at the age of 76, was the editor of Philadelphia’s Catholic newspaper when he hired me, just a 22-year-old, to be his news and sports editor back in 1974. Best of mentors I’m trying to avoid saying he was a demanding boss, because that would put too dark a tone on the reality of who he was. What he was was a boss who set high expectations – for himself as well as others. He could never understand why anyone would ever give less than 100 percent when they could inform, form and inspire God’s people through the work we did. Because he held those high standards, he could hold the reins loosely and let a young colt like me run. I tried out the latest in graphics. I cropped photos tight and used them big. I covered everything from high school football to the International Eucharistic Congress to the U.S. Supreme Court. When I reported on controversial issues, then-Monsignor Foley didn’t steer me away but defended their publication because he felt Catholics needed all the facts, and what better place for them to read them than in his favorite newspaper. Along the way he taught me the importance of planning, the value of teamwork and collaboration, and the truism that Catholic media have nothing to fear from reporting bad news. His approach to Catholic news – one forged in part at Columbia’s School of Journalism and in part by his priesthood – was that Catholic media should tell every story, tell it honestly, and tell it with compassion. And he showed us all how to be Catholic, how to live out our faith every day in all we do, with everyone whose life touched ours. When we worked for him in the mid-1970s we expected the monsignor to one day be named an auxiliary bishop. Instead he went right to archbishop; Pope John Paul II chose him to head the Vatican’s communication efforts. He became a cardinal in 2009. I’d left Philadelphia in 1977, but through the years we’d see each other at Catholic Press Association conventions and correspond occasionally. He always helped me better understand the church and my faith. All his letters – every one – included "give my love to Barbara and the children,” never forgetting my wife and that he’d baptized two of our four. When I think back I appreciate that he taught me the valuable lesson of having a reason for whatever I was doing. But even better, he showed me how to love the church, warts and all. The bureaucracy frustrated him and the politics drove him crazy, yet I don’t know how many times I heard him say, "I’ve never had an unhappy day as a priest.” It was a sentence he repeated last year when he came to the Twin Cities to help The Catholic Spirit celebrate its 100th anniversary. He wowed ‘em in Minneapolis I thought the cardinal would be a big-name draw for our centennial celebration, so about a year in advance I invited him to be our keynote speaker in January 2011. Needless to say he was a hit. He had several hundred people laughing aloud as he quipped with his host, Archbishop John Nienstedt, and told anecdotes from his years in the Catholic news ministry. It was only after he left town that I was told he had leukemia but didn’t want me to know it. Once he was diagnosed with that cancerous blood disease he had cleared his calendar for two events: the 2011 Catholic Media Convention in Pittsburgh and the 100th anniversary celebration of The Catholic Spirit in the Twin Cities. I can’t describe them, so you’ll have to imagine my feelings upon hearing that our friendship meant that much to him that he would honor his commitment to me knowing that he hadn’t long to live. Thank God he made it to Pittsburgh last June. He was the keynote speaker there, too, and as we sat down for the centennial dinner I was asked to introduce the cardinal. I wasn’t expecting that, but frankly it wasn’t difficult. I’d watched Foley through the years, and he was a master at self-effacing stories, at working an audience, at getting a message across clearly yet quickly. The hard part, the lump-in-the-throat part, was finishing up the introduction by telling him – in front of several hundred people who work in Catholic media around North America – how much he meant to me. And how much I loved him. Requiescat in pace, good and faithful servant. Bob Zyskowski is associate publisher/general manager of The Catholic Spirit.
by R. Zyskowski
Wednesday, December 14, 2011
To Know Him Through Others 0 R. Mullen I didn't know Cardinal Foley until I met him at the Annual Conference in Pittsburgh this past summer. Even then, there were so many good friends around him, I only had the chance to exchange a warm handshake. But still, I did see how all who did know him were excited to see him, happy to be around him, grateful he spent time coming to the Conference to share one more story, one more bit of wisdom. These are sentiments only expressed for a good man. So what I know of Cardinal Foley is that he was a good man, and I was blessed to be in his presence for one short day.Rest in peace, Cardinal Foley.
by R. Mullen
Monday, December 12, 2011
a favorite quote 0 P. Wiegert Some in the CPA may remember this quote as I introduced him during the Catholic Press Centennial Dinner and Concert at the Carnegie in Pittsburgh. I think it bears repeating because it not only displays his wit and deep wisdom, but also his ability to put things in a universal perspective with great love and affection. He shared this bit of wisdome during one of Bishop Thomas G. Doran's annual media luncheon's in Rockford Illinois where he was a guest speaker while he was still with the Pontifical Council for Social Communications. When asked the difference between secular journalists and Catholic journalists he said, "You (secular journalists) cover the crashes ... we (Catholic journalists) cover the landings."  He truly was a saint among us.
by P. Wiegert
Monday, December 12, 2011
Catholic Press Association Remembers 0 L. McDougal Cardinal Foley was the recipient of the Catholic Press Association's highest prize, the St. Francis de Sales Award.
by L. McDougal
Monday, December 12, 2011